Spanish Fork Dentist

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An Open Letter from Roger’s Center for Dentistry in Spanish Fork

by James Webster on March 25, 2020 , Comments Off on An Open Letter from Roger’s Center for Dentistry in Spanish Fork

To all of our Spanish Fork friends, 

I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but there’s a pandemic that has affected our lives significantly. We’re kidding, right? Yes, we certainly are! Roger’s Center for Dentistry, your hometown, Spanish Fork dentist is closed for all non-emergency procedures at the direction of the Utah Department of Health until April 25, 2020.Of course, we are able to help with emergencies (abscessed, broken, or painful tooth and dental emergencies) during the next month. 

You’re not alone 

As Governor Herbert has asked Utahns to stay home, it’s easy to become stir crazy and feel depressed, anxious, fearful and lonely. For those with children, the added need to monitor their education looms large and many parents are overwhelmed. First of all, let’s tip our hats to the exemplary educators who have worked long and hard to get their lessons online for our children! They have risen to the occasion and deserve our gratitude and praise! Thank a teacher today! 

Kids can be stressed too 

Not only has your life changed, but so has your child’s routine. For many, they are too young to fully comprehend the cause and they become fearful, anxious, and lonely. They hear words that they don’t know and assume the worst. Whenever possible, find ways for your children to interact with their friends, grandparents, etc. This social connection isn’t as good as in-person, but it can help for everyone to feel less isolated. 

What about school? 

Well, take a moment to think about this one. Is your child the only one who has been gone from school? Will all the other kids be ahead of them? This is a state-wide situation and every single school in Utah is filled with kids being educated remotely. As such, the reteaching or review time will be there. And guess what? Your children’s teachers can and will handle it! Talk to your child’s teacher if you feel overwhelmed. They can and will offer suggestions to help. Just do your best. That is all you can do. 

It’s hard for all of us in our tight-knit community to be socially isolated, but by doing so now, we can help stop the spread of COVID-19 and come out on the other side with as few casualties as possible. We really miss serving you and look forward to getting back to help you.  

Stay healthy, 

Roger’s Center for Dentistry, your favorite Spanish Fork dental practice 

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Tooth Fairy 101

by James Webster on January 8, 2020 , Comments Off on Tooth Fairy 101

It’s easy to understand why so many of our young patients inquire about one with whom we are well-acquainted – the Tooth Fairy. She sends her helpers to regularly watch as we do our work so that she can make sure to collect all the teeth lost.  

The Tooth Fairy is shrouded in mystery without much information about her origin or what she does with all those teeth! Unfortunately, Dr. Rogers, while a good friend of hers, is sworn to protect her secrets, those few that he knows, of course. 

When did the Tooth Fairy start visiting children in the United States? 

Each culture has a tradition or superstition surrounding the loss of baby teeth. In Europe, the tradition is that mice collect children’s teeth, and in France, the practice continues with “le Petit Souris.” Somewhere during the late 19th and early 20th century, the Tooth Fairy as we know and love her began to visit children in the United States. The first written mention of her was found in 1927 in a short collection of stories for children. 

How does she do it? 

Like Santa and the Easter Bunny, there is a certain level of magic and mystery around the Tooth Fairy’s ability to accomplish such a monumental feat. Remember that Santa and the Easter Bunny have significantly more visits to make and must do so in one night, and the Tooth Fairy only visits those children’s homes who have lost teeth. While she still has a lot to do each night, she doesn’t visit nearly as many homes as do the others. Some have suggested that she has regional helpers, which makes a lot of sense. 

How much does the Tooth Fairy bring on average? 

This is a tricky question, because it really varies. She takes into consideration the quality of the tooth, whether it is the first lost tooth or a later one, and even if it was lost because of an accident or needed Dr. Rogers to help pull it. In 2019, the average gift from the Tooth Fairy was $3.70 per tooth. 

Even though Dr. Rogers, your hometown, Spanish Fork dentist is sworn to secrecy about all that he knows of the Tooth Fairy, he loves to help children take care of their teeth so that they can have the chance to earn top dollar! Make an appointment with Rogers Dentistry today, Spanish Fork’s leading dental practice. 

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Wisdom Teeth 101

by James Webster on December 10, 2019 , Comments Off on Wisdom Teeth 101

 With the ease of recording with our mobile devices, we can record life’s events that, before, were just retold as family stories. Social media trends in recording post wisdom teeth removal musings have resulted in some of the funniest videos online. 

I can’t tell you how glad I am that no one was taping my post wisdom teeth behavior because I am told that at one point asked, “Mommy, please carry me,” right before I buckled at the knees and fell to the floor of a parking garage with the grace and style of Bambi on the icy pond. I have been told that this move was appreciated by all the lookers-on and that one man came to help my mother in her noble efforts in restoring me to an upright position. 

Why take out wisdom teeth – don’t these kids need all the wisdom they can get? 

Yes, they certainly do, but these extra teeth don’t do much in that arena, sorry! (Couldn’t help it, it’s something that we hear a lot!) 

There are many reasons that you may need to see an oral surgeon to have your wisdom teeth removed in your late teens and early adulthood. The most common one of these, according to your friendly Spanish Fork dentist is that there is just not enough room in your mouth for four more teeth. In this case, the wisdom teeth are impacted, meaning that they are not coming in at the right angle and can push against the molars or even partially erupt.  

They’re impacted – how important is it to take them out? 

If your wisdom teeth are impacted, the best course of action is to have them removed by an oral surgeon. So doing can prevent infection, cysts around the improperly aligned wisdom tooth/teeth, pain, and even tooth decay since the crowding can result in difficulty brushing and flossing. 

Oral oddities 

Did you know that many people are missing one or more of their wisdom teeth? This tends to run in families, so if one of your close relatives didn’t have all four, then you may have hit the wisdom teeth jackpot too.  

On the other hand, some people are born with too many teeth. My father was born with two sets of baby teeth, one of them fully erupted shortly after birth! Sadly, there is no photographic evidence of this shark-like oddity. Likewise, he had six wisdom teeth instead of four. 

If your wisdom teeth come in and you don’t have any trouble with them, it is still important to monitor them for signs of increased tooth decay, so come on in to your friendly Spanish Fork Dental practice, Rogers Dentistry, and we’ll let you know if you won a trip to the oral surgeon or not! 

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Ways to Use Your FSA Before Year End

by James Webster on November 22, 2019 , Comments Off on Ways to Use Your FSA Before Year End

At the end of each year, many people scramble to use their Healthcare Flexible Spending Accounts (FSA) before the balance disappears. There is a little-known and too infrequently used option for people to continue to have access to their FSA funds after the ball drops on the old year and ringing in the new. Some FSA plans have a rollover limit of $500 that can be rolled over into the next year by employers. If you have this option in your employee benefit package, funds that were rolled over must be used by March 15 of the new year, otherwise the remaking balance is absorbed by your employer. 

In case you need some ideas for ways to use the last of your FSA, we’ve come up with a few ideas for you. 

Dental work 

Obviously, you expect that this would be in here, right? Is it time for your annual check-up? Do you need more extensive work done? Does your child need an orthodontic consultation? These all great ways to use up your FSA balance before it disappears.  

There are many eligible procedures that Dr. Rogers performs in his Spanish Fork dental practice that qualify for FSA payments. It is important to note that contrary to popular belief, FSAs do not always cover a procedure that is not covered by your medical, vision, or dental plan. One of the most common for these is the cosmetic practice of tooth whitening. 

Vision 

When did you last have your eyes examined? Exams, contact lenses, glasses, and corrective vision surgery are all eligible for FSA use. You can even use your FSA to pay for prescription sunglasses or blue light-blocking lenses. 

Home use 

Contraceptives, including condoms, are FSA eligible. Additional items that are FSA-eligible include first aid supplies, doctor-prescribed over the counter medicines, as well as splints, braces, etc. Orthotics are covered as well as just some gel insoles. 

With a little creativity and planning, you can use your FSA account to its maximum potential. While so doing, please consider Dr. Rogers, the compassionate Spanish Fork dentist for any of your dental needs. 

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Make Halloween and Easter Your Teeth Cleaning Traditions

by James Webster on October 15, 2019 , Comments Off on Make Halloween and Easter Your Teeth Cleaning Traditions

How long has it been since you had your teeth cleaned? Your children’s? If you are anything like me, there is a long to-do list that is constantly running in my head and there are many things that get pushed from day to day, and really don’t get done.

Dr. Rogers, your neighborhood Spanish Fork dentist, has the best trick to help people remember their dental health by taking a page from the play book from firefighters and breast cancer awareness month.

One of the keys to remembering information is tying it to something else that jogs your memory. Firefighters have long asked people to use the change from daylight savings to standard time, and vice versa as a signal to change the batteries in their smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. Or, if you’re like me, watch the episode of, “This is Us” that reveals the details around Jacks death – you’ll be changing them every other week!

I was out with my (single) sister once at a town celebration and her young daughter was chatting with one of the firefighters telling them that she absolutely knew that their smoke detector worked. When asked how she knew this, she promptly answered, “Because it goes off every time my mom cooks!”  I’ve been around my sister long enough to attest to the veracity of this statement.

Another reminder comes in October, being the it is breast cancer awareness month, it is easy to have an annual screening mammogram It’s pretty much automatic now; the sight of football players running around with pink shoes, socks, or towels and I think, “mammogram!” Little secret – if you schedule your annual mammogram in October, you often receive treats or souvenirs at the hospital, including a certain Utah County hospital in Provo that including gifts gourmet chocolates to anyone having their mammogram in October. So, on that note, it might be the chocolate more than the football players.

On that same vein, if you are having trouble remembering to come in, Dr. Rogers suggests that you come in for visits around two holidays that both tend to be all about the candy – Halloween and Easter. Please consider adding regular dental appointments to come in and see us at our long-time Spanish Fork dental practice. We’re always here to help your family take care of dental needs.

What happened with my food-burning sister and the firefighter? Believe it or not, they married three years later! Does she still set off the smoke detector when she cooks? Yep!

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Vaping and Dental Health 101

by James Webster on September 13, 2019 , Comments Off on Vaping and Dental Health 101

Unless you’ve been underneath a rock or in a cave for the last several months, you have likely noticed that there is a surge of news about the health risks of vaping. Researchers are scrambling to discover if vaping is as safe as it’s been advertised as well as learn if the tidal wave of otherwise unexplainable health problems are related to vaping. Dr. Rogers, your hometown Spanish Fork dentist, wants his patients to make informed decision about their e-cigarette use before they start to vape, or to help motivate them to abandon this dangerous practice.

No tobacco means no cancer, right?

Nope! While true, e-cigarettes do not contain tobacco, they do contain nicotine, which is the addictive substance in cigarettes that has known medical risks. Nicotine is a known carcinogen and has been shown over decades of research to promote tumor growth in the lungs, pancreas, breasts, and gastrointestinal tract.

Nicotine and gun disease

Nicotine is a significant cause of gum disease since it constricts blood vessels, reducing the oxygen and nutrient flow to your entire body. The reduction of circulation to your mouth and cheeks destroys your gums, causing them to recede as the disease progresses, and the ultimate death of healthy gum tissue, tooth decay, and tooth loss.

Vaping and dry mouth

When looking at the effects of vaping on your mouth and its natural production of saliva, there is a connection between the various ingredients in the pods and dry mouth. The most significant effects seem to be from propylene glycol, which is frequently used as the base oil of pods. As there are new formulas coming out faster than experts can test them, there are likely others that will be detected. When the saliva production is limited in your mouth, beyond being uncomfortable, the body’s natural defense to wash bacteria out of your mouth is limited.

Don’t start, and if you already do – stop

It really comes to this, please don’t start vaping. It is not safer than cigarettes, quite the opposite. Please book an appointment with Roger’s Dentistry, a leading Spanish Fork dental practice to discuss the effect that vaping has on your teeth and let us help you keep your mouth healthy.

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Did You Know That Drinking Water Helps Your Oral Health?

by James Webster on August 15, 2019 , Comments Off on Did You Know That Drinking Water Helps Your Oral Health?

One of the most well-known and under-followed health tips is that we should be consuming 6-8, 8 oz. glasses of water daily, or 48-64 oz. That sounds like a lot, but to put it into perspective, we compared the sizes of drinks purchased at Fast Food restaurants, all of them near Dr. Rogers’ Spanish Fork dental practice.

  • McDonald’s
    • Small – 16 oz.
    • Medium – 21 oz.
    • Large – 30 oz.
  • Wendy’s
    • Kids – 12 oz.
    • Value – 16 oz.
    • Small – 20 oz.
    • Medium – 30 oz.
    • Large – 40 oz.
  • KFC
    • Small – 16 oz.
    • Medium – 20 oz.
    • Large – 30 oz.
    • Mega Jug – 64 oz.

Most of the other fast food chains have similar sizes to these above. Looking at it, you can easily see how much you are drinking if you consume these beverages and see how you can easily consume your minimum daily recommended water intake by substituting water for any of these drinks.

Healthier teeth and gums

When you drink water, you are washing away bits of food that can be trapped in your teeth and gums after you eat. Water also washes away bacteria that can lead to tooth decay, gun disease, and the dreaded halitosis (bad breath). Regularly drinking your daily recommended 48-64 oz. of water helps your mouth produce saliva, your body’s natural defense mechanism against tooth decay.

Helps with dry mouth

For cases of mild dry mouth, increasing your water intake through the day is one of the best ways for your mouth to feel better. However, Dr. Rogers, your trusted Spanish Fork dentist, counsels his patients to share with him if your mouth is excessively dry. While rare, there are a few serious health conditions which can cause extreme dry mouth. Another co-occurring symptom of dry eyes can also signal health challenges.

Bonus tip

Gargling daily with hot (not scalding) salt water can help your teeth and gums greatly, as the salinity is a natural killer of bacteria.

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Tools of the Trade – Toothbrushes

by James Webster on July 15, 2019 , Comments Off on Tools of the Trade – Toothbrushes

Walking down the dental hygiene aisle of your local store can give the impression that selecting the proper toothbrush is a task similar to that of deciding on a college major or whom to marry. There are all sizes, shapes, and colors from which to choose, each one claiming that it does a better job of cleaning your teeth than the others – so how do you choose? Pick the blue one. Seriously though, there are things to look for when picking your toothbrush.

Bristles, bristles, bristles – which to pick?

Selecting hard or medium bristles can strip your teeth of their protective enamel, leaving them more sensitive. Selecting soft bristles is best. As far as the shape of the bristles, you should pick a toothbrush that is comfortable to use and the bristles can reach all your teeth’s surfaces.

Head and handle size

Next to choosing the bristle softness, the head size is the next most important consideration for your oral health. Looking at all of the options available and the claims that are leveraged by different toothbrush brands, it’s easy to be overwhelmed or unsure. Dr. Rogers, your hometown Spanish Fork dentist, recommends that his patients select a toothbrush with a head that is comfortable to fit into their mouth, small enough to be easily maneuvered to reach all surfaces of your teeth, with a handle size that is comfortable to use. All children should have smaller toothbrushes, which are often labeled by age recommendations on the packaging.

Manual vs. electric

With proper brushing technique (two to three minutes total, brushing all surfaces of every tooth as well as your gums, palate, tongue and inside of your cheeks), manual toothbrushes work as well as power toothbrushes. There are a few situations that make a power toothbrush preferable. Those with poor manual dexterity, with tightly spaced teeth, braces, or misaligned teeth often benefit by using power toothbrushes over manual.

How old is your toothbrush?

If the last time that you changed your toothbrush was the last time you visited our Spanish Fork dental practice, you probably need to do so right now. The average life of a toothbrush is one to three months before the bristles show signs of wear. In other words, if your bristles don’t look like they’ve been used and you can’t remember when you last changed your toothbrush, you not only need to replace your toothbrush, but make an appointment to come in and see us. It’s important to replace your toothbrush after you have been sick as well.

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Dental Accidents – Lost Tooth 101

by James Webster on May 15, 2019 , Comments Off on Dental Accidents – Lost Tooth 101

As summer draws near in southern Utah County, so does the chance of injury to the mouth, gums and teeth. One of the more common injuries from impact, falls, etc., is a lost tooth. With proper first aid and timing in getting to your Spanish Fork dentist, permanent teeth that have been knocked out can be saved.

If a baby tooth is lost, can it be saved?

If a baby tooth is knocked out, the tooth will not be re-implanted, as this can damage the permanent tooth as it grows in. Nonetheless, the child should be seen to ensure that there are no further injuries to the mouth, gums and surrounding teeth. In this case, call your dentist after the injury and get ready for the tooth fairy, who will be visiting your child. Word on the street is that this visit from the tooth fairy tends to be very generous for teeth that were lost in an accident, etc.

What about a permanent tooth?

Unlike baby teeth when lost, which cannot be replaced into the mouth, permanent teeth can and should be whenever possible. If a permanent tooth is lost, proper care can mean the difference between losing the tooth permanently or the dentist being able to replace it.

Steps to take when a permanent tooth is lost

Find and carefully handle the tooth. Only handle the tooth by the crown. Avoid touching the root. Clean the tooth gently and prepare it for re-implantation by keeping tooth moist. If possible, place tooth in clean milk. Water is an option if milk is not available, but not a great substitution for an extended period. If neither milk nor water is available, put the cleaned tooth into the mouth and hold it between molars and cheek. Don’t so this if there is a risk that the tooth would be swallowed, i.e. if the person is agitated, etc.

Call your dentist for an immediate appointment. Successful re-implantation requires seeing a dentist within an hour or so. You do have your favorite dentist in Spanish Fork, Dr. Rogers, as one of your contacts in your phone, right? If not, take a moment to do so, just in case.

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Are You Experiencing Chronic Dry Mouth?

by James Webster on December 18, 2018 , Comments Off on Are You Experiencing Chronic Dry Mouth?

Do you ever feel like your mouth is as dry as the Salt Lake Desert in July? One of the more common dental complaints is excessive oral dryness. While there are many potential causes for this annoying condition, the one that is the most common culprit is medication-induced dry mouth. Rather than this being something that you should just live with and ignore, there are several reasons that it is important to report all of your prescriptions to Dr. Rogers and his staff and if you have any dryness in your mouth, a sore or scratchy throat, or hoarseness.

Which medications cause dry mouth?

In his Spanish Fork dental practice, Dr. Rogers sees patients who experience the symptoms above as a side effect to common medications, such as antihistamines, decongestants, anti-convulsive drugs, and anti-depressants. Patients who take multiple medications from these categories obviously have a higher risk of developing dry mouth.

Halitosis

Nearly 90 percent of all dental patients presenting with chronic bad breath, or halitosis, have dry mouth. When there is not adequate saliva to lubricate the mouth, you lose the ability to fight certain bacteria which cause bad breath. If you are experiencing chronic bad breath, please make an appointment with Dr. Rogers.

Tooth Decay

Along with the bacteria that can cause bad breath, when there is not enough saliva in the mouth, you are more likely to have cavities. It is a common misconception that tooth decay is a childhood problem; cavities can be present in any mouth.

Sensitivity

If you do not have enough saliva, you can develop oral sensitivity. Teeth can de-mineralize, your ability to taste may decrease, and you may have chronic sore throats.

Other medical concerns

Good oral health is necessary for general good health. While not the most common cause of dry mouth, it is possible that you may be suffering from an otherwise undetected and potentially serious disease, such as an autoimmune disease or poorly-controlled diabetes.

Treating dry mouth at home

You can treat dry mouth by sucking on sugar-free candies, chewing sugar-free gum, using a mouth rinse without alcohol, and staying hydrated. Some patients find that they are more comfortable using lip balm regularly.

Even though your prescriptions were prescribed by your medical doctor in Spanish Fork, your dentist can help monitor the condition and help you maintain your oral health. If you are experiencing dry mouth, alert your physician and make an appointment to come in to see the dentist.

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